The Alpine Club, the world’s first mountaineering club, was founded in 1857.  For over 150 years, members have been at the leading edge of worldwide mountaineering development and exploration. 

With membership, experienced and aspiring alpinists benefit from a varied meets programme, regional lectures with notable guest speakers, reduced rates at many alpine huts, opportunity to apply for grants to support expeditions, significant discounts at many UK retailers, extensive networking contacts, access to the AC Library and maps - and more! 

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Death Announcements

Death Announcements & Tributes

Terence Goodfellow

Glyn Hughes writes: I am sorry to have to tell members of the death of our member Terence Goodfellow. Terence had been an AC member since 1962, introduced to the Club by his father Basil Goodfellow, an AC Hon Secretary, who also started Terence on his alpine career.
Terence was a President of the Cambridge University Mountaineering Club, and while at university was member of an expedition to Baffin Island.
In 1968 he was a member of a team who climbed Miangul Sar in Swat Kohistan. We believed this to be a first ascent, but later discovered we had been pipped to the post by an Austrian party who climbed it from the opposite side. At least ours was a new route.
Terence was a regular attender at AC lectures until quite recently when his mobility became restricted.

Robert Caukwell

It is with sadness that we report the recent death of Robert Caukwell. He was a member of the AC for 47 years from 1960, resigning in 2007 due to illness.

Tribute to Dennis Davis from Dennis Gray

Dennis was without doubt a leading British alpinist of the 1950's and into the 1960's. My own keenest memories of my own climbs with him were an ascent of Pigott's route in the big winter of 1962/3, when he led the final crack with its severe ice coating, shod in tricouni studded boots in the coldest conditions I have experienced in the UK, and an ascent around the same period of the Western Gully of Black Ladders. It was on such winter climbs, and in the Alps and the Himalaya that Dennis showed his outstanding abilities as a mountaineer.

Dennis Davis

An extract from a tribute written by Jim Gregson for the Karabiner Mountaineering Club

From 1946 onwards, Dennis had amassed a huge range of experience in the UK and the European Alps, but he also had the drive and ambition that allowed him to make his mark in the Greater Ranges. He had tried to get a place on the expedition which made the first ascent of Kangchenjunga but this was not to be. Instead, Dennis went in the same year, 1955, to the Rolwaling Himal where in a single lengthy trip his expedition team made first ascents of no less than 19 peaks of 20,000 feet altitude. In 1957 he went back to altitude in Nepal on expedition to Annapurna IV with Charles Evans and then to Distaghil Sar.